Last edited by Teramar
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

7 edition of Women, Work and Computing found in the catalog.

Women, Work and Computing

by Ruth Woodfield

  • 329 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social issues,
  • Women"s studies,
  • Supply and demand,
  • General,
  • Social Science,
  • Business / Economics / Finance,
  • Women"s Studies - General,
  • Sociology,
  • Women electronic data processing personnel,
  • Women & Business,
  • Social Science / Gender Studies,
  • Women electronic data processing personnel--Supply and demand--Forecasting,
  • Gender Studies,
  • Forecasting,
  • Women electronic data processi

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages209
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7752937M
    ISBN 100521771897
    ISBN 109780521771894

      This book provides an unprecedented look at the history of women and men in computing, detailing how the computing profession emerged and matured, and how the field became male coded. Women's experiences working in offices, education, libraries, programming, and government are examined for clues on how and where women succeeded—and where Author: Janet Abbate.   This opening quote from Janet Abbate’s book Recoding Gender: Women’s Changing Participation in Computing () captures the feminisation of computing work as a standard norm in the post-war United States and United Kingdom and the subsequent decline of women’s participation in computer science and programming from the Second World War to Author: Bidisha Chaudhuri.

    She has been the faculty advisor for the Women in Computing at Cornell since its inception, and though WICC's helped encourage many more women to choose CS major. She earned her PhD in , the year that had most women in computing (see for example, the charts in this article for trends in percentage of women in computing).   ↑ For more specific information on computing techniques and work, see Sheryll Goecke Powers, Women in Flight Research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center from Monographs in Aerospace History No. 6, NASA History Office, , and Golemba, Human Computers. ↑ Author’s interview with Margaret Hurt, Center: Langley Research Center.

      The untold history of women and computing: how pioneering women succeeded in a field shaped by gender , women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs. Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male “computer geek” seems to be everywhere in popular culture. Few .   Why Women Programmers Were the Foundation of the Computing Age, and Where They Went Women in computing helped Britain win World War II. Then they were pushed out of the industry, and the industry.


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Women, Work and Computing by Ruth Woodfield Download PDF EPUB FB2

Women, Work and Computing; Women, Work and Computing. Women, Work and Computing. Get access. Cited by. Crossref Citations. This book has been cited by the following publications.

This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef. Faulkner, Wendy The Power and the Pleasure. A Research Agenda for “Making Gender Stick” to Cited by: Get this from a library.

Women, work and computing. [Ruth Woodfield] -- "Although few dispute the computer's place as a pivotal twentieth-century artefact, little agreement has emerged over whether the changes it has precipitated are generally positive or negative in.

Get this from a library. Women, Work and Computing. [Ruth Woodfield] -- An exploration of the optimistic claims that computers will provide women with a wealth of opportunities in the future. This book presents and discusses a large amount of new quantitative evidence to.

The computing profession faces a serious gender crisis. Today, fewer women enter computing than anytime in the past 25 years. This book provides an unprecedented look at the history of women and men in computing, detailing how the computing profession emerged and matured, and how Work and Computing book field became male coded/5(5).

Book Women Women, Work and Computing, by Ruth Woodfield Article (PDF Available) in Critical Sociology 28(3) May with 61 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Dimitrina Dimitrova.

Book Abstract: A fresh, constructive examination of the gender imbalance in computer education and technology The computing profession is facing a serious gender crisis. Women are abandoning the computing field at an alarming rate. Fewer are entering the profession than anytime in the past twenty-five years, while too many Women leaving the field in mid-career.

Read this book on Questia. Women, Work, and Computing by Ruth Woodfield, | Online Research Library: Questia Read the full-text online edition of Women, Work. Women in Computing presents how the computing industry delivered the opportunities for women.

This book identifies the distinct attitudes in companies towards equal opportunities. Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the problems, the opportunities, the successes and failures, and provides some insight into what Book Edition: 1. The interviews capture the dynamic details of the female computing experience, from the family computer kept in a brother's bedroom to women's feelings of alienation in college computing classes.

The authors investigate the familial, educational, and /5(18). Given the amount of work, more “computers” were hired, including three women Melba Nea, Virginia Prettyman and Macie Roberts. Macie Roberts’ computing group circa (far right).Author: Brynn Holland.

Women in Computing presents how the computing industry delivered the opportunities for women. This book identifies the distinct attitudes in companies towards equal opportunities.

Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the problems, the opportunities, the successes and failures, and provides some insight into what. Authors Jane Margolis Jane Margolis is a Senior Researcher at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies and the coauthor of Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing (MIT Press).

She was a White House Champion of Change for her work addressing underrepresentation of students of color and women in computer science. If you've heard in the past or from other books that women used to dominate computing and then were forced out, but you aren't clear about the specifics of how such a process could happen, then Programmed Inequality is a great book about the intersections of labor, sexism, new technology, and governance/5.

Book Abstract: Today, women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs.

Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male "computer geek" seems to be everywhere in popular culture. The untold history of women and computing: how pioneering women succeeded in a field shaped by gender biases. Today, women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs.

Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male “computer geek” seems to be everywhere in popular culture. Few people know that women.

Sobel: At first, much of the women’s work entailed computing the actual positions and brightness of individual stars by applying mathematical formulae to. Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work Computer programmers are expected to be male and antisocial - an self-fulfilling prophesy that forgets the women that the entire field was built upon.

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a nonfiction book written by Margot Lee Shetterly. Shetterly started working on the book in The book takes place from the s through the s when some viewed women as inferior to men.

The biographical text follows the lives of Katherine Author: Margot Lee Shetterly. The Arab Women in Computing has many chapters across the world and focuses on encouraging women to work with technology and provides networking opportunities between industry experts and academicians and university students.

Some major societies and groups have offshoots dedicated to women. Book Description. The computing profession faces a serious gender crisis. Today, fewer women enter computing than anytime in the past 25 years.

This book provides an unprecedented look at the history of women and men in computing, detailing how the computing profession emerged and matured, and how the field became male coded. Women, Work and Computing by Ruth Woodfield. Buy Women, Work and Computing online for Rs.

- Free Shipping and Cash on Delivery All Over India! They’re disproved at every turn by, for instance, the history of computing. My book shows very clearly how on both sides of the Atlantic, women were in fact pioneers in programming, pioneers in computing work. And this was because the work was actually seen as fairly low-skilled.

It was seen as unimportant, early on.This is a timeline of women in covers the time when women worked as "human computers" and then as programmers of physical ally, women programmers went on to write software, develop Internet technologies and other types of programming.